May 17 2016

FoMO? What’s missing?

Category: AddictionsPatricia @ 4:13 pm

homer fomo

 

Have you heard of FoMO? It means “Fear of Missing Out”. Perhaps you or someone you know suffers from this. I notice it all the time. Although it’s been around since time began, it’s become quite rampant in our society. We are actively programming our children to participate in the behavior. Remember, children learn what they live.

I’m sure you’re familiar with the term RSVP. You’ve most likely seen it on a formal invitation to a party or event. It is French for “Respondez Sil Vous Plait”, which translates to “please respond”. Its purpose is to allow the host to plan for the appropriate number of guests. It simply insures there is enough food and drink for everyone to enjoy; and a big enough space to accommodate the party. The proper thing to do is to respond with your intentions and to do it in a timely manner. It is the considerate and courteous thing to do. Lately, FoMO has taken its’ toll on RSVP! People hesitate to respond or make a commitment just in case something better comes along. We don’t want to miss out! We can’t commit until all options have been considered.

Dr. Dan Herman, who coined the term FoMO says “FoMO is experienced as a clearly fearful attitude towards the possibility of failing to exhaust available opportunities and missing the expected joy associated with succeeding in doing so. Simply put, it is concentration of attention on the empty half of the glass.”

With everyone equipped with a mobile device and access to social media such as Facebook and Instagram, we are immediately aware of all the options that are available to us. Communication is on a 24/7 basis. We worry that we don’t have the time or money to take advantages of the opportunities. FoMO has evolved in the past century because of several recent ideologies such as feminism and capitalism. We have the ability to choose based on our sense of self-worth. We are busy pursuing careers, family life and social activities. We actively pursue hobbies. We move around, relocating to new places, exploring new possibilities. We are quick to respond to opportunities and easily adopt to new technology, upgrading on a regular basis. Our lives are spent constantly on the lookout for new experiences and instant gratification.

Dr. Herman’s research shows that approximately 70% of all adults experience FoMO to various degrees. Coping well with FoMO can lead to positive behaviors which impact financial and social success. Almost 30% of FoMO sufferers cope well with it. They are able to use it in a positive manner. About 25% of those are somewhat unhappy with their lives but manage to function well. Sadly, a little over 15% of those are miserable; unable to cope effectively with the fear.

I’m a little afraid of FoMO. I think it can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Remember, you always get what you are thinking about. You manifest what you focus upon. When you are busy trying to exhaust all options, you can miss out on everything! Life is happening in the now moment. FoMO creates paralysis about the future. It creates indecision and doubt. When you are driven by FoMO, you are unable to commit to anything or anyone. Every commitment means you are giving up something else…and maybe its better. Perseverance is non-existent. Life is completely out of control.

I recently had the experience of visiting with a friend. Although I know she was very happy to be present, she was anxious about what else was happening. She didn’t want to miss out! She needed to check her Facebook feed whenever she was prompted. She needed to read posts. She needed to post what she was doing. She needed to respond to text messages. She needed to keep track of the scores for her favorite team. She needed to read her email. What she needed to do was to relax and put the phone down!!!!!!  There is a lot of pressure to keep up. And there is no need to do so. I invite you to step away from the addiction to know about everything that is going on in the world. If you focus on what matters to you, you won’t be missing out on anything. If you focus on what is happening in your inner world… rather than the world outside of yourself… you will not miss out on anything.

There is an ad running now on TV where a family loses their internet service for a minute. Everyone exhibits stress. The young girl glumly states, “Something has just happened in the world and we have no idea what it was.” Most of the time when something is happening somewhere in the world, it doesn’t matter. All the time when something is happening in your world, it does matter. Pay attention. You are creating what you fear. You are missing out. You’re focusing on the empty half of the glass.

 

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Jul 23 2013

An Angel Takes Flight

Category: AddictionsPatricia @ 5:39 pm

Pre-Flight

 

Jane made a splash. A big one. She was a flashy, splashy woman and I was honored to call her my friend. She had a mane of flaming red hair which at times reached to her waist and was her crowning glory – her trademark. Damn, it was as vibrant at 60 as it was at 16! It was one of Jane’s statements. At her best, tall, thin and statuesque with legs that went on forever, she could have stepped out of the pages of Vogue. But Jane wasn’t always at her best. But who among us, can say they are always at their best? She had some demons. We all do. Sadly, Jane’s demons had a thirst for alcohol.

Years may have passed between contacts, but time stood still in the space of sister-friends. We met in high-school and were semi-roommates during college in Boston. She lived in a studio apartment on the floor below me and the other sisters. Life happened. I met my husband and moved to California. Jane went to New York City to become a production director.  Visits were sporadic but the connection remained. In the past 8 years, it blossomed.

That connection is linked to a little cottage on the Connecticut shore – a symbol of childhood and roots with the past. I visited the cottage at the beginning of summer. Usually a time with the promise of long lazy days and starlit nights, now a time of ending.  It feels so wrong. Jane is gone. Tragically, she passed at the beginning of the year. We all knew it was coming. A freight train out of control, we didn’t know how to stop it. A little time bomb of pain in a bottle. Her beautiful body ravaged by the years of too much… There was a fall, an ambulance and life support. Then there was no more. We all knew Jane did not want to get old.

We gathered on East Dock to scatter her ashes where the current keeps the seaweed away. The site of many midnight skinny-dips and daytime dives, it is a childhood sacred space.  We remembered Jane perched on one of the pilings preparing to dive. Always in a bikini and wearing it well. Wind-blown hair. Graceful, elegant beauty. Summer in New England.  Her favorite season. Her favorite place. Her people. We set about our sad task of letting her go.

Annie placed the ribbon-wrapped box on the piling. We cried. When Jane’s ashes were tossed, for a very long moment, they appeared to be suspended in air – a farewell dive – an angel taking flight. There was form that rode the current of the air and then there was a splash. A big one. And for a moment, the bits of matter that remained of Jane’s form lay upon the sacred waters that she loved so much. And then she was gone. Gone from our sight but not gone. We are eternal. In Hafiz’s poem, God’s Bucket, we are told,

Your existence my dear, O love my dear, has been sealed and marked, “Too sacred,” “too sacred,” by the Beloved – to ever end!

Indeed God has written a thousand promises all over your heart that say,

Life, life, life; is far too sacred to ever end.”

Our spirit may be eternal, however, as physical beings, we leave behind physical things. The cottage and all its contents remains. Waiting to be re-claimed.  Along with the sister-friends, I visited Jane’s closet. I could remember her wearing these things as we visited on the porch or while she was throwing one of her extravagant, sumptuous dinner parties.   I was delighted to retrieve a few things, a little piece of her.  And when I wear them, she’s with me. We had a fine time in Palm Springs. We wore a pair of floral-patterned sheer pants with an ivory top and drank a martini.  I loved Jane. I loved her light and her shadow. She passed away too young after a life of raising hell and doing good, loving deeds.

As we travel the circle of life, we are never alone. Relationships are forever. Once you establish a relationship, it is an eternal relationship. In a lifetime, people come and go. Some stay to leave little footprints on your heart. Be mindful of the gift of their presence before they dance away.

God’s Bucket by Hafiz

If this world was not held in God’s’ bucket

How could an ocean stand upside down on its head and never lose a drop?

If your life was not contained in God’s cup

How could you be so brave and laugh, dance in the face of death?

Hafiz, there is a private chamber in the soul that knows a great secret of which no tongue can speak.

Your existence my dear, O love my dear, has been sealed and marked, “Too sacred,” “too sacred,” by the Beloved – to ever end!

Indeed God has written a thousand promises all over your heart that say,

Life, life, life; is far too sacred to ever end.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jul 27 2012

Natural High

Category: AddictionsPatricia @ 12:19 pm

The body’s impulse for pleasure is never wrong. We are wired to seek experiences of joy and happiness in a physical form. It’s the way the body expresses well-being. Our desire for comfort is a form of yearning. Sometimes, we don’t know how to find that comfort. When we don’t have the ability to choose healthy ways to achieve that pleasure and contentment, we create destructive pleasure habits. Whether it’s to relax and chill out, get a boost or just feel good, we often turn to chemical stimulants.

“In an average week, Americans drink 1 billion cups of coffee, 3.4 million cups of tea, 4.5 billion sugared or caffeinated soft drinks, 2.3 billion alcoholic drinks; smoke 8.25 billion cigarettes and consume 400,000 tons of sugar, and 20 million pounds of chocolate. On top of this we take 20 million antidepressants, puff our way through 25 million joints, and pop 1 million tabs of Ecstasy.” Counselor Magazine “New Therapeutic Approaches: Alternative Treatments for Addictions” published 5/31/2003

Cass and Holford reported those statistics in Natural Highs (2002). In this report, they write about the impact and effectiveness of alternative, holistic strategies. It is obvious there is a need for a new way of overcoming life’s challenges.

Current research in neuroscience shows that throughout our lives, we continue to change the way we think, and therefore, we change our beliefs.  We can change the way we behave. And we can make that change without feeling anxious or sad or deprived! In my practice, I use two modalities to achieve change; hypnosis and EFT. Using the powerful mind-body connection, we can expect to see a shift in perspective and actions. These connections are supported through numerous scientific disciplines including: psychoneuroimmunology, epigenetics, interpersonal neurobiology, and neuroplasticity.

Hypnotherapy allows for the resolution of the issues that created the addictive behavior in the first place. Through behavior and perception modification, people learn to cope better and develop an improved sense of self-esteem and confidence. We are able to learn new beliefs and boundaries. We can let go of destructive behaviors and the need for mood-altering substances. With behavioral epigenetics, healing takes place on a cellular level. When we change our thoughts, we change our bodies. By achieving a relaxed state, we become receptive to new ideas and suggestions that are beneficial to us. We begin to see ourselves in a new way. We dream our world into being.

Self-hypnosis can also help boost a person’s motivation to change through self-suggestion. It can help us to connect to internal strengths we may have forgotten, as well as provide self-control. Self-hypnosis has been endorsed for stress reduction by addiction counselors, therapists, psychologists, social workers and psychiatrists. The efficacy of hypnosis is no longer a question of belief.

Since addiction is a multi-faceted problem, Energy Psychology in the form of Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) or meridian tapping, can address both causes and effects of the addiction. For instance, cravings are often caused by a desire to reduce anxiety. When we understand the trigger which causes the craving, there is no longer a need to relieve it through the addictive behavior. We learn to make a different choice.

We need to re-invent ourselves and we’re not sure we want to do that. “I can’t live with it and I can’t live without it”. EFT can be used to reinforce and focus upon the positive benefits. It can also be used to eliminate the fears and any perceived sense of loss or deprivation associated with giving up the addiction.

No one likes change. When an addict has to face change, denial and resistance are the best forms of defense. Using the Choices Method of EFT, we are able to shift our focus to the solution rather than the problem.

Freedom from addiction is life-affirming pleasure. Pleasure is a good thing. It’s a natural high!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Jul 20 2012

Is EFT Effective in Addiction Treatment?

Category: Addictions,Meridian TappingPatricia @ 2:36 pm

A pilot study was conducted byDawsonChurch, PhD of the Foundation for Epigenetic Medicine, and Audrey Brooks, PhD of the Department of Psychology, UniversityofArizona. This data was presented at Science and Consciousness, the Tenth Annual Energy Psychology conference,Toronto, October 24, 2008.

This study examined the effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques), on 39 adults self-identified with addiction issues. Psychological distress was measured by two global scales assessing intensity and breadth of symptoms and nine symptom subscales such as anxiety and depression. The assessment was made using the SA-45, a well-validated questionnaire. The SA-45 was administered before and after the workshop. Twenty-eight participants completed a 90-day follow-up.

A statistically significant decrease was observed after the workshop, indicating a reduction in psychological distress. Improvements on intensity and breadth of psychological symptoms, and anxiety and obsessive-compulsive subscales were maintained at the 90-day follow-up. These findings suggest EFT may be an effective adjunct to addiction treatment by reducing the severity of general psychological distress.

Recently, the Foundation for Epigenetic Medicine (FEM) research team found that EFT seemed to access the development of stress on both a physical and an emotional level. EFT was able to bypass the conscious, logical part of the brain and go right to the more primitive parts that control fear and stress in the midbrain. In FEM’s study, they found that individuals receiving EFT had a 24% drop in stress-hormone levels as compared to those receiving only talk therapy or no intervention at all. The EFT group also reported lower levels of anxiety and depression.

 

 

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Jul 20 2012

Is Hypnosis Effective in Addiction Treatment?

Category: Addictions,HypnotherapyPatricia @ 2:29 pm

David Spiegel, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University argues that opinions on hypnosis can no longer be a question of belief. Proof of the Effectiveness of Hypnosis,” The Times, February 18, 2002.

Significantly More Methadone Addicts Quit with Hypnosis. 94% Remained Narcotic Free

Significant differences were found on all measures. The experimental group had significantly less discomfort and illicit drug use, and a significantly greater amount of cessation. At six month follow up, 94% of the subjects in the experimental group who had achieved cessation remained narcotic free.

A comparative study of hypnotherapy and psychotherapy in the treatment of methadone addicts. Manganiello AJ, American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 1984; 26(4): 273-9.

Hypnosis Shows 77 Percent Success Rate for Drug Addiction

Treatment has been used with 18 clients over the last 7 years and has shown a 77 percent success rate for at least a 1-year follow-up. 15 were being seen for alcoholism or alcohol abuse, 2 clients were being seen for cocaine addiction, and 1 client had a marijuana addiction Intensive Therapy:

Utilizing Hypnosis in the Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders. Potter, Greg, American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, Jul 2004.

Hypnosis For Cocaine Addiction Documented Case Study

Hypnosis was successfully used to overcome a $500 (five grams) per day cocaine addiction. The subject was a female in her twenties. After approximately 8 months of addiction, she decided to use hypnosis in an attempt to overcome the addiction itself. Over the next 4 months, she used hypnosis three times a day and at the end of this period, her addiction was broken, and she has been drug free for the past 9 years. Hypnosis was the only intervention, and no support network of any kind was available.

The use of hypnosis in cocaine addiction. Page RA, Handley GW, Ohio State University, Lima, OH USA 45804. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 1993 Oct;36(2):120-3

Self-hypnosis Relapse Prevention Training with Chronic Drug/Alcohol Users: Effects on Self-esteem, Affect and Relapse

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a self-hypnosis protocol with chronic drug and alcohol patients in increasing self-esteem, improving affect, and preventing relapse against a control, a transtheoretical cognitive-behavioral (TCB), and a stress management (attention-placebo) group. Participants were 261 veterans admitted to Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Programs (SARRTPs). Participants were assessed pre- and postintervention, and at 7-week follow-up. Relapse rates did not significantly differ across the 4 groups at follow-up; 87% of those contacted reported abstinence. At follow-up, the participants in the 3 treatment conditions were asked how often they practiced the intervention materials provided them. Practicing and minimal-practicing participants were compared against the control group for each of the 3 interventions via MANOVAs/ANOVAs. Results revealed a significant Time by Groups interaction for the hypnosis intervention, with individuals who played the self-hypnosis audiotapes “at least 3 to 5 times a week” at 7-week follow-up reporting the highest levels of self-esteem and serenity, and the least anger/impulsivity, in comparison to the minimal-practice and control groups. No significant effects were found for the transtheoretical or stress management interventions. Regression analyses predicted almost two-thirds of the variance of who relapsed and who did not in the hypnosis intervention group. Hypnotic susceptibility predicted who practiced the self-hypnosis audiotapes. The results suggest that hypnosis can be a useful adjunct in helping chronic substance abuse individuals with their reported self-esteem, serenity, and anger/impulsivity.

Biofeedback Clinic (116B), Coatesville VA Medical Center, Coatesville, PA 19320-2096, USA American Journal of Clinical Hypnotherapy (a publication of the American Psychological Association) 2004 Apr;46(4):281-97)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Feb 02 2010

Hypnosis Helps Substance Abuse & Addiction

Category: Addictions,HypnotherapyPatricia @ 6:50 pm

The subconscious mind is a powerful goal-achieving machine. The mind matters. When one has the desire to let go of destructive habits and addictions, hypnotic suggestions to reinforce the motivation to achieve the goal are very effective. Subconscious programming is the basis for conscious action. Research studies show significant long term success rates.

Significantly More Methadone Addicts Quit with Hypnosis. 94% Remained Narcotic Free

Significant differences were found on all measures. The experimental group had significantly less discomfort and illicit drug use, and a significantly greater amount of cessation. At six month follow up, 94% of the subjects in the experimental group who had achieved cessation remained narcotic free.

A comparative study of hypnotherapy and psychotherapy in the treatment of methadone addicts. Manganiello AJ, American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 1984; 26(4): 273-9.

Hypnosis Shows 77 Percent Success Rate for Drug Addiction

Treatment has been used with 18 clients over the last 7 years and has shown a 77 percent success rate for at least a 1-year follow-up. 15 were being seen for alcoholism or alcohol abuse, 2 clients were being seen for cocaine addiction, and 1 client had a marijuana addiction

Intensive Therapy: Utilizing Hypnosis in the Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders. Potter, Greg, American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, Jul 2004.

Raised Self-esteem & Serenity. Lowered Impulsivity and Anger

In a research study on self-hypnosis for relapse prevention training with chronic drug/alcohol users. Participants were 261 veterans admitted to Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Programs (SARRTPs). individuals who used repeated self-hypnosis “at least 3 to 5 times a week,” at 7-week follow-up, reported the highest levels of self-esteem and serenity, and the least anger/impulsivity, in comparison to the minimal-practice and control groups.

American Journal of Clinical Hypnotherapy (a publication of the American Psychological Association)
2004 Apr;46(4):281-97)

Hypnosis For Cocaine Addiction Documented Case Study

Hypnosis was successfully used to overcome a $500 (five grams) per day cocaine addiction. The subject was a female in her twenties. After approximately 8 months of addiction, she decided to use hypnosis in an attempt to overcome the addiction itself. Over the next 4 months, she used hypnosis three times a day and at the end of this period, her addiction was broken, and she has been drug free for the past 9 years. Hypnosis was the only intervention, and no support network of any kind was available.

The use of hypnosis in cocaine addiction. Page RA, Handley GW, Ohio State University, Lima, OH USA 45804. American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis, 1993 Oct;36(2):120-3.

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Feb 02 2010

Smoking Cessation with Hypnosis

Category: Addictions,HypnotherapyPatricia @ 1:16 pm

Many studies show hypnosis to be an effective form of treatment for smoking cessation. Smoking is more than a physical addiction. It is a habit. It is behavior based on “triggers” which increase desire for the habitual action. Habits are a result of sub-conscious programming and repetitive thought patterns. As such, treatment on a subconscious level is effective and long-lasting. The following research reflects such success.

90.6% Success Rate for Smoking Cessation Using Hypnosis

Of 43 consecutive patients undergoing this treatment protocol, 39 reported remaining abstinent from tobacco use at follow-up (6 months to 3 years post-treatment). This represents a 90.6% success rate using hypnosis.

University of Washington School of Medicine, Depts. of Anesthesiology and Rehabilitation Medicine, Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2001 Jul;49(3):257-66. Barber J.

87% Reported Abstinence From Tobacco Use With Hypnosis

A field study of 93 male and 93 female CMHC outpatients examined the facilitation of smoking cessation by using hypnosis. At 3-month follow-up, 86% of the men and 87% of the women reported continued abstinence from the use of tobacco using hypnosis.

Performance by gender in a stop-smoking program combining hypnosis and aversion. Johnson DL, Karkut RT. Adkar Associates, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana. Psychol Rep. 1994 Oct;75(2):851-7.
PMID: 7862796 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

81% Reported They Had Stopped Smoking After Hypnosis

Thirty smokers enrolled in an HMO were referred by their primary physician for treatment. Twenty-one patients returned after an initial consultation and received hypnosis for smoking cessation. At the end of treatment, 81% of those patients reported that they had stopped smoking, and 48% reported abstinence at 12 months post-treatment.

Texas A&M University, System Health Science Center, College of Medicine, College Station, TX USA. Int J Clin Exp Hypn. 2004 Jan;52(1):73-81. Clinical hypnosis for smoking cessation: preliminary results of a three-session intervention. Elkins GR, Rajab MH.

Hypnosis Patients Twice As Likely To Remain Smoke-Free After Two Years

Study of 71 smokers showed that after a two-year follow up, patients that quit with hypnosis were twice as likely to remain smoke-free than those who quit on their own.

Guided health imagery for smoking cessation and long-term abstinence. Wynd, CA. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 2005; 37:3, pages 245-250.

Hypnosis More Effective Than Drug Interventions For Smoking Cessation

Group hypnosis sessions, evaluated at a less effective success rate (22% success) than individualized hypnosis sessions. However, group hypnosis sessions were still demonstrated here as being more effective than drug interventions.

Ohio State University, College of Nursing, Columbus, OH 43210, USA Descriptive outcomes of the American Lung Association of Ohio hypnotherapy smoking cessation program. Ahijevych K, Yerardi R, Nedilsky N.

Hypnosis Most Effective Says Largest Study Ever: 3 Times as Effective as Patch and 15 Times as Effective as Willpower.

Hypnosis is the most effective way of giving up smoking, according to the largest ever scientific comparison of ways of breaking the habit. A meta-analysis, statistically combining results of more than 600 studies of 72,000 people from America and Europe to compare various methods of quitting. On average, hypnosis was over three times as effective as nicotine replacement methods and 15 times as effective as trying to quit alone.

University of Iowa, Journal of Applied Psychology, How One in Five Give Up Smoking. October 1992.  (Also New Scientist, October 10, 1992.)

22% Report Kicking the Habit

Of almost 3,000 smokers who participated in one group hypnotherapy session, sponsored by the American Lung Association, to kick the habit, 22% reported not smoking for a month afterward. (The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 2000)

Studies on the Effectiveness of Hypnosis for Smoking Cessation. (2009, April 8). Retrieved from http://johnmongiovi.com

 

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